Home » Battles Involving Pergamon: Battle of Cynoscephalae, Battle of Magnesia, Battle of Mount Olympus, Battle of Gythium, Battle of Chios by Books LLC
Battles Involving Pergamon: Battle of Cynoscephalae, Battle of Magnesia, Battle of Mount Olympus, Battle of Gythium, Battle of Chios Books LLC

Battles Involving Pergamon: Battle of Cynoscephalae, Battle of Magnesia, Battle of Mount Olympus, Battle of Gythium, Battle of Chios

Books LLC

Published May 27th 2010
ISBN : 9781157077664
Paperback
34 pages
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 About the Book 

Chapters: Battle of Cynoscephalae, Battle of Magnesia, Battle of Mount Olympus, Battle of Gythium, Battle of Chios, First Battle of Lamia, Second Battle of Lamia. Source: Wikipedia. Pages: 32. Not illustrated. Free updates online. Purchase includes a free trial membership in the publishers book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Excerpt: The Battle of Magnesia was fought in 190 BC near Magnesia ad Sipylum, on the plains of Lydia (modern Turkey), between the Romans, led by the consul Lucius Cornelius Scipio and his brother, the famed general Scipio Africanus, with their ally Eumenes II of Pergamum against the army of Antiochus III the Great of the Seleucid Empire. The resulting decisive Roman victory ended the conflict for the control of Greece. The main historical sources for this battle are Livy and Appian. Antiochus was driven out of Greece following the defeat of his expeditionary force at the Battle of Thermopylae (191 BC). The Roman navy with the Rhodians and other allies outmaneuvered and defeated the Seleucid navy, permitting the Roman army to cross the Hellespont. The Roman army operated under the commands of the consul Lucius Cornelius Scipio Asiaticus, younger brother of Scipio Africanus, who accompanied him as legatus. Antiochus was accompanied by the Carthaginian general and dire enemy of the Roman Republic Hannibal Barca, who had fled to Antiochus court after his defeat at Zama and the end of the 2nd Punic War. In anticipation of the battle, Antiochus set up an entrenched camp protecting the approach to Sardis and his fleet base at Ephesos. According to both Livy and Appian, he posted his 16.000 strong phalanx, armed in the Macedonian fashion in the center in brigades (taxeis) of 1.600 men, 50 men wide and 32 men deep. He ordered intervals to be formed among the taxeis in which he placed 2 elephants each. On the right wing, next to the phalanx, he arrayed 1500 Gallograecia...More: http: //booksllc.net/?id=26429